Sermons by Rev. Scott McRoberts

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Let’s Go! (Luke 9:1-9)

So to be a follower of Jesus is to do more than just receive His rescue mission in this world. It’s to become part of the team who make more followers of Jesus, too. That’s the point of our church, or any church. Just as Jesus and His followers have made Jesus known to us, we will make Him known to our friends, families, colleagues, people we get to know. Just as we’re baptised when we’ve begun being discipled as Jesus’ followers, we’ll baptise people as they begin that discipleship journey, too.

Sowing and growing (Luke 8:1-15)

What is Jesus up to in the world? And why do people all respond to it in such different ways? Those are the two questions we find answered in Luke 8:1-15. First, we’ll look at vv.1-3, where Luke reminds us about what Jesus’ mission was. To ‘proclaim good news’ is to broadcast far and wide, loud and clear, some circumstances that are changing in a really good way. And the great transformation that’s taking place that Jesus wants people to know about is ‘The Kingdom of God.’

Sin, forgiveness, love (Luke 7:36-50)

‘Your sins are forgiven…’ How do you react to that? Are you angry or offended just now? Are you feeling guilty? Are you feeling delight and freedom? What’s going on in your head and heart as you hear those words: ‘Your sins are forgiven’? In Luke 7:36-50, Jesus has things to teach us about sin, forgiveness, and love. He shows us that these three things relate together in a way that nobody around Him is really expecting. And I’m desperately concerned we’re not expecting either, in our community or in our church.

Great Unexpectations (Luke 7:18-35)

What do you expect Jesus to do? In your life? In this world? And what if that doesn’t happen? Do you decide that Jesus is getting things wrong? Or that He isn’t the God you thought He was? Or that your expectations about Him were wrong? In Luke 7:18-35, Jesus shows that who He is and what He has come to do might differ greatly from our expectations of Him. And He gets us to see that it’s our expectations of Him that are questionable, not His identity.